The Complex System of Homo Sapiens

Over the past few million years, homo sapiens have evolved in very specific ways to meet their surrounding. We have become not only complicated, multi-cellular life, but also conscious and highly complex entities that require special care and attention. For much of our existence as a species, humans have been hunter-gatherers just like many of our monkey relatives. Our problem (if you want to call it that) is that we allowed wheat and a handful of other plants domesticate us in the same spot.

Looking back at the fossil records of homo sapiens, it is easy to see we were not meant for a sedentary life that agriculture has brought to us. This is one of the reasons why so many agricultural people, during the change from hunter-gatherer lifestyles, were breaking their bones and generally less healthy than their counterparts.

Even today we are finding that many people have chiropractic problems because they are living a lifestyle their body was not suited for. The only problem is, as modern science develops, we find even more influences on how our bodies work. For many people, what they believe to be pain in their musculature is actually a deficiency in magnesium. Many people who utilize magnesium for their nerves find that it is incredibly therapeutic. This is just one of the examples of how complex a system homo sapiens are and how our modern environment has left us in a poor situation.

If you are looking to supplement with magnesium for your nerves, it is a good idea to consider getting a bioavailable form of the supplement. This nutrient should be consumed in the quantity of around 200 mg of elemental magnesium per day, which could mean different quantities for the different types. Examples of good magnesium are magnesium glycinate and L-threonate.

Our ancestors were not meant to be as sedentary as we are. Try to make sure you get up, move around, do some exercise, and include more nutrition that we lack in today’s time!

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